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This is an excerpt from a member-only article. To read the article in its entirety, please login, subscribe, or try out HSC for 30 days.

CDC launches campaign to catch sepsis early

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December 1, 2017

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has launched a campaign to help bring attention to the dangers of sepsis, a condition that is fast becoming the number one cause of death in U.S. hospitals.

The CDC launched the initiative in late August. Called “Get Ahead of Sepsis,” the program is an educational initiative to protect Americans from the devastating effects of sepsis, including emphasizing the importance of early recognition and rapid treatment, as well as the importance of preventing infections that could lead to sepsis.

According to a CDC statement, sepsis is the body’s extreme response to an infection. It is life-threatening, and without timely treatment, sepsis can rapidly lead to tissue damage, organ failure, and death. Each year in the U.S., more than 1.5 million people develop sepsis, and at least 250,000 Americans die as a result.
Some reports indicate that one person dies in U.S. hospitals from sepsis every 20 seconds. To make matters worse, the treatment and screening for sepsis could lead to an increase in other common and pesky healthcare infections, including Clostridium difficile (C. diff), according to a new report published in the American Journal of Infection Control.



This is an excerpt from a member-only article. To read the article in its entirety, please login, subscribe, or try out HSC for 30 days.

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